Why Music?

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At Puyallup Preschool & Kindergarten of the Performing Arts, we believe that music is the most powerful and efficient tool for long-lasting, effective education. We strive to design each topic or subject around music. We sing and sign about it; we play instruments about it; we dance and move in a way that represents the subject matter.


1: Why teach with music? Music are not only part of our built-in, biological design, but it also develops essential neurobiological systems.  Music is in every culture in the world; babies (that have not been influenced by society) respond to music; plants and animals respond to music; Making music/playing an instrument uses every part of the brain. At Puyallup Preschool & Kindergarten of the Performing Arts, we teach all subject matter with music-based, biology as the foundation of the lesson.  

2: How is music biological? Consider the following -  Music is in every culture in the world; babies (that have not been influenced by society) respond to music; plants and animals respond to music; Making music/playing an instrument uses every part of the brain. We are physiologically designed to be musical!

3: Do children learn faster with music? Absolutely! The retention rate so much higher and longer lasting than another other form of learning. Consider that babies retain and respond to music that they heard in utero for up to a year. The average radio-listening, shower-singing adult knows over 2000 songs! How many math equations or history dates does one have a recall of 2000? So, equipping children with songs and music activities that teach them needed skills, truly equips them for life in a way no other learning can!

4: Can’t my child just take band in the 5th grade?  The earlier a child starts regular music study, the more benefit there is from the enhanced interhemispheric brain activity for auditory processing. The fibers in the corpus callosum (which connect the left- and right-brain hemispheres) are as much as 15% larger in musicians compared to non-musicians. But this only occurred when the adults stared playing before the age of 8.  By the age of 10, the areas of the brain that benefit from musical study are 80% matured.  Ultimately, longitudinal studies showed that children who do 14 months of musical training, before the age of 8, displayed powerful structural and functional brain changes.

5. What does playing an instrument actually do? While your child plays, they are implementing their entire brain. Visual processing is taking place as the child reads the notes and translates the written language of music into an action. At the same time, the child is listening. Listening to make sure they are playing at the correct time. Listening that they are playing loud or soft. Listening to the instructor giving any additional instruction. The child is also kinesthetically involved, using their hands or body to create the sound, pitch or word required at the precise moment it needs to happen. When playing, the child could be making (on average) 5000 decisions every minute! And the whole time, they are strengthening their skills as visual, aural and kinesthetic learners. When all of this is tied to learning the alphabet, math facts or scientific information – the capacity for learning is endless and it’s fun!!!

At Puyallup Preschool & Kindergarten of the Performing Arts
we play piano, violin, hand bells, drums, xylophones,
hand percussion and we sing!!!! 

18 Benefits of Playing a Musical Instrument*

1: It increases the capacity of memory.
2: It refines time management & organizational skills.
3: It boost’s the child’s team skills.
4: It teaches perseverance.
5: It enhances coordination.
6: It betters mathematical ability.
7: It improves reading and comprehension skills.
8: It increases sense of responsibility.
9: It exposes the child to cultural history.
10: It sharpens the ability to concentrate.
11: It fosters self-expression and relieves stress.
12: It creates a sense of achievement.
13: It promotes social skills.
14: It boosts listening skills.
15: It teaches discipline.
16: It elevates performance skills and reduces stage fright.
17: It enhances the respiratory system.
18: It promotes happiness.

*Taken from
www.EffectiveMusicTeaching.com


“I would teach children music, physics, and philosophy;
but most importantly music, for in the patterns of music
are the keys to all learning”
- Plato



Additional Resources:

Brewer, C., & Campbell, D. G. (1992). Rhythms of learning: creative tools for developing lifelong skills. Cheltenham, Vic.: Hawker Brownlow Education.

Gilbert, A. G. (1977). Teaching the three Rs: Through movement experiences; a handbook for teachers. Minneapolis, MN: Burgess.

Habermeyer, S. (2014). Good music, brighter children: simple and practical ideas to help transform your childs life through the power of music. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace.

Jensen, E. (2004). Arts with the brain in mind. Moorabbin, Vic.: Hawker Brownlow Education.

Jensen, E. (2000). Music with the brain in mind. San Diego (CA, USA): The Brain Store.

Levitin, D. J. (2016). This is your brain on music: the science of a human obsession. New York, NY: Dutton.



















    
  1. Violin Recital 2017 - Puyallup Preschool & Kindergarten of the Performing Arts
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